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Roof Cleaning Long Island N.Y 516-763-4108 wrote:

You said it goes in a " roof pipe " do you think a pvc pipe will be strong enough and not break?




 I was thinking the same thing. Will it work on a 10 or even a 12? Does anyone have any pics of how



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maineman50327 wrote:

Great story. I am cleaning a cedar shake house and have been using a rope with tie off. Not a good idea on shake roofs. I need a sefety harness set up. Anyone have recommendations? I can't make Charleston. So need to get set up now.

Please pm info.

Thanks



simply tie off to a tree, a deck, post, a water portable water tank, their has got to be something? and besides you should void walking on cedar shakes try using a section of an extension ladder and a roof hook!

 



-- Edited by Roof Cleaning NJ on Wednesday 8th of September 2010 11:54:39 PM

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I would be afraid of falling and busting a pvc vent pipe to pieces. I guess if it slowed me down enough though Id still be alive to go back up there and fix it!

What do yall do if it means getting in a precarious position to set your rigging up?

Im sure like anything else there are many pieces to a puzzle?



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Not to make any one feel dumb but never tie off around the electrical plate, I say this because it is tempting because it is close to the edge of the roof. Just thought I would mention it.
Now don't throw things at me for sounding silly!! lol
TC KIM

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BCRoofClean wrote:

Seriously it is a great safety tool. I wonder if they can put a self recoiling device at the end of it so you aren't tripping over the hose and safety rope.
Just like a vacuum cord, and go one step further add in a quick tension stop just like a seatbelt. That would maximize roof cleaning safety. It shouldn't be hard to do its just seatbelt science.




 Tried the self recoilers.......................bleach kill self recoilers.

Guys I guarantee we will have about a dozen or more at SC. After that we will have a vendor that will be offering these online for direct ship. Along with the gutter cane and the ladder stabilizer. I will have a dozen or so of each of these for SC.

AC



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Hey AC, something I just thought about.....Are these OSHA approved or acceptable?

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Gutter cane and ladder stabilizer? I have a stabilizer but is yours different? Please explain.

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I want one, no... TWO!

Please?

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Roof Cleaning, Pressure Washing, Paver Cleaning and Restoration
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BCRoofClean wrote:

Seriously it is a great safety tool. I wonder if they can put a self recoiling device at the end of it so you aren't tripping over the hose and safety rope.
Just like a vacuum cord, and go one step further add in a quick tension stop just like a seatbelt. That would maximize roof cleaning safety. It shouldn't be hard to do its just seatbelt science.




Those are available now, super common on big commercial construction jobs. I think there would be pros and cons with using them for roof cleaning though. One thing to consider is that they don't actually bind up for several feet during a fall. Combine that with the way the rope is tethered, and there could easily be spots on the roof where you could actually go all the way to the ground if you fell.

Same thing could happen with a regular rope, but at least you would be more aware of where you were in relation to the anchor since you have to let out the rope manually.

 



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Confident Roof Cleaning Houston TX wrote:

Hey AC, something I just thought about.....Are these OSHA approved or acceptable?



They are acceptable but not approved. OSHA doesnt get into the approval process. They use third party associations to approve products.

AC

 



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Matthew wrote:

I want one, no... TWO!

Please?



I will have several in my booth at the SC event. About one week later they will be available online...........................did I say that aloud?

AC

 



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Here are the standards,

Fall Protection Guidelines
A synopsis of OSHA’s Fall Protection Standards (OSHA standard 29 CFR 1926.501 through 503).

Fall protection is generally thought of as:

  1. Guardrail systems
  2. Safety net systems
  3. Personal fall arrest systems
  4. Positioning device systems, and/or
  5. Warning line systems

The standard:

  • Covers most construction workers except persons inspecting, assessing, or investigating the workplace conditions prior to the start of work or after the completion of work.
  • Identifies areas or activities where fall protection is needed.
  • Sets a uniform threshold height of six (6) feet
  • Allows employers to select fall protection measures that are best suited for the work being performed.

Guardrail requirements:

  • Top edge height of top rails must be 42 inches (+/- 3 inches) above working/walking level & support 200 lb. force (use at least 2″x4″ lumber for wood top rails).
  • Mid rails, screens, mesh, intermediate vertical members, or equivalent emmbers shall be installed mid-way between the top rail and working/walking level & support 150 lb. force (use at least 1″x6″ lumber for wood mid rails).
  • Toe boards shall be 3.5 inches high & support 50 lb. force.
  • Posts shall be no more than 8 feet apart (use 2″x4″ lumber for wood posts).

gaurdrail_requirements
Fall Arrest Systems: Harness, Lanyard, Connectors & Anchors

  • Shall be inspected prior to each use.
  • Attachment point to body shall be in the center of the wearer’s back.
  • Limit fall to six (6) feet and prevent contact with lower levels.
  • Limit maximum deceleration distance to 3.5 feet.
  • D-rings & snaphooks must have minimum tensile strength of 5,000 pounds.
  • Lanyards & lifelines must have minimum breaking strength of 5,000 pounds.
  • Self retracting lifelines & lanyards that limit fall distance to 2 feet or less must have minimum tensile strength of 3,000 pounds applied to the device with lifeline fully extended. Greater than 2 feet the minimum tensile strength must be 5,000 pounds.
  • Anchorages must be capable of supporting at least 5,000 pounds.
  • Body belts & other positioning device systems are not a part of the personal fall arrest system.

Positioning Device Systems

  • Should limit falls to no more than 2 feet.
  • Secured to an anchor capable of supporting a potential impact of 2x the impact load of the employees fall or 3,000 pounds (whichever is less).
  • Requirements for d-rings, snaphooks & other connectors must meet those of  personal fall arrest systems.

Covers

  • On roadways, capable of support 2x the maximum axle load of the largest vehicle expected to impact the cover.
  • Capable of supporting 2x the weight of employees and equipment.
  • Must be secured when installed.
  • Color coded and marked “HOLE” or “COVER”.

Alternative Measures to Personal Fall Protection

Three alternatives include warning line systems, controlled access zones, and safety monitoring systems.  The employer must prove conventional fall protection is not feasible or would cause a greater hazard & develop a written fall protection program.  Does not include roofing, overhand bricklaying or residential construction practices.

Warning line systems

  • Only allowed on low-sloped roofs (less than or equal to 4×12 pitch).
  • Must be erected around all sides and not less than six (6) feet from the roof edge.
  • Flagged at least every 6 feet with high visibility material.
  • Rigged and supported so the line is between 34 inches and 39 inches.
  • Stanchions must be able to support a 16 pound horizontal force.
  • Warning line must be able to support a 500 pound minimum tensile strength.
  • Must be used in conjunction with another fall protection system.

Controlled access zones

  • Erected between 6 -25 feet from the unprotected/leading edge.
  • Control lines must consist of ropes, wires, tapes, or equivalent.
  • Flagged at least every 6 feet with high visibility material.
  • Rigged and supported so the line is between 39 inches and 45 inches.
  • Capable of support a minimum 200 lb. stress.
  • Extend along the entire length of the unprotected or leading edge and connected to each side of the guardrail system or wall.

Safety Monitoring Systems

  • Competent person is responsible for recognizing and warning employees of fall hazards.
  • Competent person must be on same working level.
  • Competent person must be able to communicate orally with workers.
  • Competent person must not have any other duties which distract from the monitoring duties.

Information provided in Colorado State University’s 6 page document entitled “Fall Protection Guidelines in Construction” and can be downloaded HERE:(Fall Protection Guidelines (71))



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Grizzly wrote:

Gutter cane and ladder stabilizer? I have a stabilizer but is yours different? Please explain.




The stabalizers AC has are thicker, larger and stronger than the conventional ones most of us buy from big box stores.  They are soilid state, not the quick removable ones.  I saw one in Tampa and will be making the switch.  We have broken the other kinds time and time again.



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Please send me the info on the roof anchor.  I don't use a harness because of the holes in the roof.  I would use it if I didn't have to drill holes.

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AC Lockyer wrote:

Here are the standards,

Fall Protection Guidelines
A synopsis of OSHA’s Fall Protection Standards (OSHA standard 29 CFR 1926.501 through 503).

Fall protection is generally thought of as:

  1. Guardrail systems
  2. Safety net systems
  3. Personal fall arrest systems
  4. Positioning device systems, and/or
  5. Warning line systems

The standard:

  • Covers most construction workers except persons inspecting, assessing, or investigating the workplace conditions prior to the start of work or after the completion of work.
  • Identifies areas or activities where fall protection is needed.
  • Sets a uniform threshold height of six (6) feet
  • Allows employers to select fall protection measures that are best suited for the work being performed.

Guardrail requirements:

  • Top edge height of top rails must be 42 inches (+/- 3 inches) above working/walking level & support 200 lb. force (use at least 2″x4″ lumber for wood top rails).
  • Mid rails, screens, mesh, intermediate vertical members, or equivalent emmbers shall be installed mid-way between the top rail and working/walking level & support 150 lb. force (use at least 1″x6″ lumber for wood mid rails).
  • Toe boards shall be 3.5 inches high & support 50 lb. force.
  • Posts shall be no more than 8 feet apart (use 2″x4″ lumber for wood posts).

gaurdrail_requirements
Fall Arrest Systems: Harness, Lanyard, Connectors & Anchors

  • Shall be inspected prior to each use.
  • Attachment point to body shall be in the center of the wearer’s back.
  • Limit fall to six (6) feet and prevent contact with lower levels.
  • Limit maximum deceleration distance to 3.5 feet.
  • D-rings & snaphooks must have minimum tensile strength of 5,000 pounds.
  • Lanyards & lifelines must have minimum breaking strength of 5,000 pounds.
  • Self retracting lifelines & lanyards that limit fall distance to 2 feet or less must have minimum tensile strength of 3,000 pounds applied to the device with lifeline fully extended. Greater than 2 feet the minimum tensile strength must be 5,000 pounds.
  • Anchorages must be capable of supporting at least 5,000 pounds.
  • Body belts & other positioning device systems are not a part of the personal fall arrest system.

Positioning Device Systems

  • Should limit falls to no more than 2 feet.
  • Secured to an anchor capable of supporting a potential impact of 2x the impact load of the employees fall or 3,000 pounds (whichever is less).
  • Requirements for d-rings, snaphooks & other connectors must meet those of  personal fall arrest systems.

Covers

  • On roadways, capable of support 2x the maximum axle load of the largest vehicle expected to impact the cover.
  • Capable of supporting 2x the weight of employees and equipment.
  • Must be secured when installed.
  • Color coded and marked “HOLE” or “COVER”.

Alternative Measures to Personal Fall Protection

Three alternatives include warning line systems, controlled access zones, and safety monitoring systems.  The employer must prove conventional fall protection is not feasible or would cause a greater hazard & develop a written fall protection program.  Does not include roofing, overhand bricklaying or residential construction practices.

Warning line systems

  • Only allowed on low-sloped roofs (less than or equal to 4×12 pitch).
  • Must be erected around all sides and not less than six (6) feet from the roof edge.
  • Flagged at least every 6 feet with high visibility material.
  • Rigged and supported so the line is between 34 inches and 39 inches.
  • Stanchions must be able to support a 16 pound horizontal force.
  • Warning line must be able to support a 500 pound minimum tensile strength.
  • Must be used in conjunction with another fall protection system.

Controlled access zones

  • Erected between 6 -25 feet from the unprotected/leading edge.
  • Control lines must consist of ropes, wires, tapes, or equivalent.
  • Flagged at least every 6 feet with high visibility material.
  • Rigged and supported so the line is between 39 inches and 45 inches.
  • Capable of support a minimum 200 lb. stress.
  • Extend along the entire length of the unprotected or leading edge and connected to each side of the guardrail system or wall.

Safety Monitoring Systems

  • Competent person is responsible for recognizing and warning employees of fall hazards.
  • Competent person must be on same working level.
  • Competent person must be able to communicate orally with workers.
  • Competent person must not have any other duties which distract from the monitoring duties.

Information provided in Colorado State University’s 6 page document entitled “Fall Protection Guidelines in Construction” and can be downloaded HERE:(Fall Protection Guidelines (71))



Perfect. Thats what I was wondering.

 



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AC Lockyer wrote:

Matthew wrote:

I want one, no... TWO!

Please?



I will have several in my booth at the SC event. About one week later they will be available online...........................did I say that aloud?

AC

 



Dont forget though guys, if you buy them at the booth there NO SHIPPING costs.

 



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Just got the final pcs back from the fabricator. I will be offering show specials for those who attend. I will release the prices a couple days before the show. I will do a package for one roof anchor, one gutter cane and one ladder stabilizer, for one discounted package price. I will bring 20 of each. Looks like the demand will be big.

AC

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AC, what is the gutter cane?

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gutter-cane.jpg

Gutter Cane is used to attache to a garden hose and hang from the gutter. This keeps clean water flowing through the gutters so no chemical remains behind. The end is wraped in vinyl hose so it doesnt slip or marl the gutter up.

AC

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I wouldn't be too concerned about the strength of the PVC pipe, it goes through plywood, between roof joists, and likely into a wall top plate. The pole is going to go drop down through some or all of those things. I think the plywood alone in the roof would be plenty sufficient for anyone of any weight.

If PVC shattered like safety glass, then yeah I would be concerned. I've never seen it do that. Even if the portion above the roof was weak from UV deterioration and shattered, the part inside that the pipe is sitting in would most likely be full strength. With that holding the pipe perpendicular, and braced at the hole in the plywood on the roof, it aint going anywhere. Nobody is going to pull sideways through plywood.

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