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Post Info TOPIC: Algae blooms associated with African Dust Storms


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Date: Feb 2, 2010
Algae blooms associated with African Dust Storms
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Algae blooms are known to be correlated to the annual dust storms we receive from the Northwest African desert each year.  Blooms off the florida coast (http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a
000000/a002200/a002241/index.html
) and blooms in the Gulf of Mexico (http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/stories/dust/) have been attributed to these dust storms.  It is believed that the iron contained in the dust fertilizes the algae in the ocean.  This concept has actually been used by John Martin of the Moss Landing Marine Laboratory to fertilize the oceans and induce algae growth.  The algae is encouraged to grow to sequester CO2 and counteract some of the CO2 attributable to man. (http://www.whoi.edu/oceanus/viewArticle.do?id=34167)

Does anyone think that this could also happen on the roof?  Have any of you noticed the rapid appearance of GM on roofs that were recently almost algae-free?  The dust is known to bring living organisms to our shores as well (http://www.
washingtonpost.com/
wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/05/AR2008020502950.html
) so it is possible that in addition to delivering key nutrients the dust can potentially innoculate a roof as well. 

Anyone notice particularly bad years for algae growth?

-- Edited by Apple Roof Cleaning Tampa FL (813) 655-8777 on Tuesday 2nd of February 2010 03:38:31 PM

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Date: Feb 2, 2010
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InterestedParty wrote:

Algae blooms are known to be correlated to the annual dust storms we receive from the Northwest African desert each year.  Blooms off the florida coast (http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a
000000/a002200/a002241/index.html
) and blooms in the Gulf of Mexico (http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/stories/dust/) have been attributed to these dust storms.  It is believed that the iron contained in the dust fertilizes the algae in the ocean.  This concept has actually been used by John Martin of the Moss Landing Marine Laboratory to fertilize the oceans and induce algae growth.  The algae is encouraged to grow to sequester CO2 and counteract some of the CO2 attributable to man. (http://www.whoi.edu/oceanus/viewArticle.do?id=34167)

Does anyone think that this could also happen on the roof?  Have any of you noticed the rapid appearance of GM on roofs that were recently almost algae-free?  The dust is known to bring living organisms to our shores as well (http://www.
washingtonpost.com/
wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/05/AR2008020502950.html
) so it is possible that in addition to delivering key nutrients the dust can potentially innoculate a roof as well. 

Anyone notice particularly bad years for algae growth?

-- Edited by Apple Roof Cleaning Tampa FL (813) 655-8777 on Tuesday 2nd of February 2010 03:38:31 PM




To us roof cleaners, there is no such thing as a "Bad Year for algae growth" !
Generally, the wetter the year is, the more algae.
In the drought years here in Florida, roofs were staying clean a lot longer.
Buy now that rainfall has returned to normal, roofs are filthy lately, in comparason.

 



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813 655 8777

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Guest

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Posts: 237
Date: Feb 2, 2010
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InterestedParty wrote:

Algae blooms are known to be correlated to the annual dust storms we receive from the Northwest African desert each year.  Blooms off the florida coast (http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a
000000/a002200/a002241/index.html
) and blooms in the Gulf of Mexico (http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/stories/dust/) have been attributed to these dust storms.  It is believed that the iron contained in the dust fertilizes the algae in the ocean.  This concept has actually been used by John Martin of the Moss Landing Marine Laboratory to fertilize the oceans and induce algae growth.  The algae is encouraged to grow to sequester CO2 and counteract some of the CO2 attributable to man. (http://www.whoi.edu/oceanus/viewArticle.do?id=34167)

Does anyone think that this could also happen on the roof?  Have any of you noticed the rapid appearance of GM on roofs that were recently almost algae-free?  The dust is known to bring living organisms to our shores as well (http://www.
washingtonpost.com/
wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/05/AR2008020502950.html
) so it is possible that in addition to delivering key nutrients the dust can potentially innoculate a roof as well. 

Anyone notice particularly bad years for algae growth?

-- Edited by Apple Roof Cleaning Tampa FL (813) 655-8777 on Tuesday 2nd of February 2010 03:38:31 PM



What does innoculate mean as in "can potentially innoculate a roof" ?  Sounds like something I did to my girlfriend last night?  Never mind, just looked it up.  Anyways, those...zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz..........links are......very....zzzzzzzzzzz......interesting.  Almost have...zzzzzzzzzzz....the..second one...zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz


oops, just woke up, better go spend my time making some money

 



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Grand Rapids, MI 49525


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Roof Washing Exterior House Cleaning Grand Rapids, MI



Guest

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Posts: 1486
Date: Aug 5, 2010
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KP Diamond wrote:


 

InterestedParty wrote:

Algae blooms are known to be correlated to the annual dust storms we receive from the Northwest African desert each year.  Blooms off the florida coast (http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a
000000/a002200/a002241/index.html
) and blooms in the Gulf of Mexico (http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/stories/dust/) have been attributed to these dust storms.  It is believed that the iron contained in the dust fertilizes the algae in the ocean.  This concept has actually been used by John Martin of the Moss Landing Marine Laboratory to fertilize the oceans and induce algae growth.  The algae is encouraged to grow to sequester CO2 and counteract some of the CO2 attributable to man. (http://www.whoi.edu/oceanus/viewArticle.do?id=34167)

Does anyone think that this could also happen on the roof?  Have any of you noticed the rapid appearance of GM on roofs that were recently almost algae-free?  The dust is known to bring living organisms to our shores as well (http://www.
washingtonpost.com/
wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/05/AR2008020502950.html
) so it is possible that in addition to delivering key nutrients the dust can potentially innoculate a roof as well. 

Anyone notice particularly bad years for algae growth?

-- Edited by Apple Roof Cleaning Tampa FL (813) 655-8777 on Tuesday 2nd of February 2010 03:38:31 PM



What does innoculate mean as in "can potentially innoculate a roof" ?  Sounds like something I did to my girlfriend last night?  Never mind, just looked it up.  Anyways, those...zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz..........links are......very....zzzzzzzzzzz......interesting.  Almost have...zzzzzzzzzzz....the..second one...zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz


oops, just woke up, better go spend my time making some money

 

 




 



-- Edited by Randyr5150 on Thursday 5th of August 2010 01:27:47 PM

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