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Roof Cleaning Institute Of America Master Certified Roof Cleaning Instructor

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Date: Dec 5, 2010
SAFETY TIPS
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I posted some MSDS sheets in another post, and had a few fellow members suggest to put this in it's own thread. I started this thread hoping everyone can contribute to it with thier safety tips. We can make this a STICKY, and use it as our Premium Member safety reference. Safety should be top on our list before we ever start a Roof Cleaning job.

We should ALL have MSDS Sheets for any chemical we carry in our truck/trailer.
I'll get it started:

Just download and print
Hope this helps some of you out there.



Attachments
MSDS-Water.pdf (44.8 kb)
MSDS-TSP.pdf (37.5 kb)
MSDS-Usborax.pdf (155.9 kb)
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Wow...Thank you Chris!!!! Nice to have this info in one place.

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Thanks!

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Here is some info I found on Federal regulations of trailers, work trucks.
(Article from Work Truck Online)

DOT Mandates May Apply When Using Trailers

When a Midwestern company bought an out-of-stock Ford F-350 Duallie to pull a small trailer full of training materials, it hardly considered the truck falling subject to federal regulation. Used to operating a large fleet of mostly cars, commercial truck regulations were never a big concern.

Even the company’s Ford Explorer Sport Tracs used to tow trailers fall under the weight limit, which exempts them from Department of Transportation (DOT) commercial operating requirements.

But, after having a driver of its F-350 stopped in Nebraska, pulled over to a weight station, and cited for failing to have a DOT number/decal, the company’s fleet manager learned how easy it is to cross the line into regulation territory.

“We dug into it, got on line with the DOT and started entering all the information required,” says the fleet manager.

“I had to learn all the requirements and regulations for log-keeping, hours on the road, and so forth,” the fleet operator added.

Such experiences aren’t unique. Many fleet managers, particularly those with insurance companies and pharmaceuticals who typically operate cars, are caught off guard when they first begin buying trucks and trailers.

DETERMINING REGULATIONS
"Many companies have one of two common misconceptions," says Julie Timberlake, DOT Compliance and Driver Safety Programs Manager for Sprint Nextel Corp., Overlake Park, Kan.

"They may think because they’re not hauling cargo, it’s not a commercial motor vehicle or it’s exempt from regulations because it’s too small," she adds.

"Big trucks are pretty self explanatory, in terms of their regulation requirements, but a lot of people don’t understand that with a 1/2- or 3/4-ton truck, the gross combination weight rating (GCWR) comes into play. As soon as you tow anything, even a small trailer, if the GCWR is greater than 10,000 pounds, it becomes a commercial vehicle because of its combination weight rating,” she adds.

At that point, companies are required to obtain a DOT number and follow guidelines as set forth by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA).

The driver must have a medical exam, for example, documented on a DOT form. In addition, employers need to keep a driver file, including items such as a certificate of road test evaluation, background check on moving violations, and a log of hours spent on the road.

Employers also must provide documented driver training on various regulations.

If the vehicle carries something as seemingly harmless as spray paint or bug/insect repellent, for example, that qualifies as hazardous material, requiring specialized driver training every three years.

These are just some of the numerous requirements outlined by the FMCSA in its regulations for commercial vehicles. Complete details are available online at www.fmcsa.dot.gov.

The regulations apply to:

Vehicles with a GVWR or gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of more than 10,000 lbs. Vehicles with a GVWR of more than 26,000 lbs., which require commercial driver license (CDL). Vehicles hauling hazardous materials, whether operating across state lines or totally within one state. Trucks or for-hire small buses designed to carry more than 16 people, including the driver. The regulations are lengthy and potentially confusing. For example, operators can drive 3/4- or 1/2-ton pickups without requiring a DOT sticker, if there is no trailer attached. But adding a trailer may put it over the 10,001-pound GCWR regulation limit. For that reason, Sprint Nextel, for example, uses magnetic DOT number decals that it attaches only when its pickups are towing a trailer. “If you’re not towing, the GCWR is not in effect, and you don’t have to display any signage. And the DOT won’t bother you,” says Timberlake. On days that any of its vehicles meet the definition of a commercial motor vehicle, the company also requires that drivers conduct a pre-trip inspection and be satisfied the truck is in safe operating condition, as specified by Sections 396.13 and 392.7 of the FMSCR. The driver must also document a post-trip inspection, in accordance with section 396.11. The next time the pickup truck is used, the report must be maintained and reviewed, prior to operating the vehicle, even if days, weeks, or months have elapsed.CROSSING STATESEven though DOT regulations only apply to vehicles crossing state lines, some states, like California and North Carolina, also have in-state commercial truck requirements. California regulations are very stringent, exceeding even those of the federal government. They require operators of trucks with trailers over 10,001 lbs. GVW, for example, to have CDL licenses. They’re also very confusing. Says Timberlake: “If you’re crossing state lines, you’re responsible to know any of the rules of that state, over and above the federal regulations.” The information is typically available online from the state’s department of motor vehicles, which is usually the governing administration. In some states, it’s available from the highway patrol. BRAKING IT DOWNEven savvy operators can be caught off guard by federal regulation governing trailer brakes, for example. Section 393.42 on the FMSCR Web site notes a requirement for the truck and trailer to have a common braking system for all wheels. Basically, that means when an operator steps on the brakes they must apply pressure to all truck and trailer wheels at the same time. One fleet operator interviewed by Work Truck noted that many of the company’s trailers were originally equipped with surge brakes. Surge brakes, unlike electrical brakes, operate under inertia. Typically, surge brakes are incapable of providing DOT’s one-brake-for-all-wheels requirement. After discussion among its supervisors, the company took the action needed to retrofit the trailers. It decided to retrofit its fleet with electrical brakes. Such a retrofit costs about $600 and can be done in a few hours. The confusion surrounding the brake systems resulted from the company’s departments not taking the FMCSRs into consideration prior to ordering trailers. Last July, a fleet official within the company created an internal fact sheet for departmental supervisors, which explained the surge brake issue in layman’s terms. Electric brakes use a single valve to control braking on all the vehicle’s truck/trailer wheels. A small brake control box, typically mounted under the dash, controls the amount of braking pressure and how quickly it’s applied after the operator steps on the brakes. DOT regulations really have a major impact on vehicle spec’cing, the company’s fleet manager noted. And in that respect, it pays to thoroughly study the guidelines and consider all the ways in which an operator’s trucks might be used in the future before spec’cing them.

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Roof Cleaning Institute of America Premium Member/MODERATOR

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Date: Dec 7, 2010
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SP Cleaning wrote:

Here is some info I found on Federal regulations of trailers, work trucks.
(Article from Work Truck Online)

DOT Mandates May Apply When Using Trailers

When a Midwestern company bought an out-of-stock Ford F-350 Duallie to pull a small trailer full of training materials, it hardly considered the truck falling subject to federal regulation. Used to operating a large fleet of mostly cars, commercial truck regulations were never a big concern.

Even the company’s Ford Explorer Sport Tracs used to tow trailers fall under the weight limit, which exempts them from Department of Transportation (DOT) commercial operating requirements.

But, after having a driver of its F-350 stopped in Nebraska, pulled over to a weight station, and cited for failing to have a DOT number/decal, the company’s fleet manager learned how easy it is to cross the line into regulation territory.

“We dug into it, got on line with the DOT and started entering all the information required,” says the fleet manager.

“I had to learn all the requirements and regulations for log-keeping, hours on the road, and so forth,” the fleet operator added.

Such experiences aren’t unique. Many fleet managers, particularly those with insurance companies and pharmaceuticals who typically operate cars, are caught off guard when they first begin buying trucks and trailers.

DETERMINING REGULATIONS
"Many companies have one of two common misconceptions," says Julie Timberlake, DOT Compliance and Driver Safety Programs Manager for Sprint Nextel Corp., Overlake Park, Kan.

"They may think because they’re not hauling cargo, it’s not a commercial motor vehicle or it’s exempt from regulations because it’s too small," she adds.

"Big trucks are pretty self explanatory, in terms of their regulation requirements, but a lot of people don’t understand that with a 1/2- or 3/4-ton truck, the gross combination weight rating (GCWR) comes into play. As soon as you tow anything, even a small trailer, if the GCWR is greater than 10,000 pounds, it becomes a commercial vehicle because of its combination weight rating,” she adds.

At that point, companies are required to obtain a DOT number and follow guidelines as set forth by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA).

The driver must have a medical exam, for example, documented on a DOT form. In addition, employers need to keep a driver file, including items such as a certificate of road test evaluation, background check on moving violations, and a log of hours spent on the road.

Employers also must provide documented driver training on various regulations.

If the vehicle carries something as seemingly harmless as spray paint or bug/insect repellent, for example, that qualifies as hazardous material, requiring specialized driver training every three years.

These are just some of the numerous requirements outlined by the FMCSA in its regulations for commercial vehicles. Complete details are available online at www.fmcsa.dot.gov.

The regulations apply to:

Vehicles with a GVWR or gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of more than 10,000 lbs. Vehicles with a GVWR of more than 26,000 lbs., which require commercial driver license (CDL). Vehicles hauling hazardous materials, whether operating across state lines or totally within one state. Trucks or for-hire small buses designed to carry more than 16 people, including the driver. The regulations are lengthy and potentially confusing. For example, operators can drive 3/4- or 1/2-ton pickups without requiring a DOT sticker, if there is no trailer attached. But adding a trailer may put it over the 10,001-pound GCWR regulation limit. For that reason, Sprint Nextel, for example, uses magnetic DOT number decals that it attaches only when its pickups are towing a trailer. “If you’re not towing, the GCWR is not in effect, and you don’t have to display any signage. And the DOT won’t bother you,” says Timberlake. On days that any of its vehicles meet the definition of a commercial motor vehicle, the company also requires that drivers conduct a pre-trip inspection and be satisfied the truck is in safe operating condition, as specified by Sections 396.13 and 392.7 of the FMSCR. The driver must also document a post-trip inspection, in accordance with section 396.11. The next time the pickup truck is used, the report must be maintained and reviewed, prior to operating the vehicle, even if days, weeks, or months have elapsed.CROSSING STATESEven though DOT regulations only apply to vehicles crossing state lines, some states, like California and North Carolina, also have in-state commercial truck requirements. California regulations are very stringent, exceeding even those of the federal government. They require operators of trucks with trailers over 10,001 lbs. GVW, for example, to have CDL licenses. They’re also very confusing. Says Timberlake: “If you’re crossing state lines, you’re responsible to know any of the rules of that state, over and above the federal regulations.” The information is typically available online from the state’s department of motor vehicles, which is usually the governing administration. In some states, it’s available from the highway patrol. BRAKING IT DOWNEven savvy operators can be caught off guard by federal regulation governing trailer brakes, for example. Section 393.42 on the FMSCR Web site notes a requirement for the truck and trailer to have a common braking system for all wheels. Basically, that means when an operator steps on the brakes they must apply pressure to all truck and trailer wheels at the same time. One fleet operator interviewed by Work Truck noted that many of the company’s trailers were originally equipped with surge brakes. Surge brakes, unlike electrical brakes, operate under inertia. Typically, surge brakes are incapable of providing DOT’s one-brake-for-all-wheels requirement. After discussion among its supervisors, the company took the action needed to retrofit the trailers. It decided to retrofit its fleet with electrical brakes. Such a retrofit costs about $600 and can be done in a few hours. The confusion surrounding the brake systems resulted from the company’s departments not taking the FMCSRs into consideration prior to ordering trailers. Last July, a fleet official within the company created an internal fact sheet for departmental supervisors, which explained the surge brake issue in layman’s terms. Electric brakes use a single valve to control braking on all the vehicle’s truck/trailer wheels. A small brake control box, typically mounted under the dash, controls the amount of braking pressure and how quickly it’s applied after the operator steps on the brakes. DOT regulations really have a major impact on vehicle spec’cing, the company’s fleet manager noted. And in that respect, it pays to thoroughly study the guidelines and consider all the ways in which an operator’s trucks might be used in the future before spec’cing them.

 



Good post Chris!

I'll have to read this a few times to get it all into this somewhat thick skull, then go see what my state requirements are since I will be setting up a trailer. I've been pulling this trailer for years and I know it's heavy. I just have no clue what the trailer and truck weighed together. Once I get all the tools and supplies out it will be much lighter. I just don't want to give VDOT anything to harass me with. Weight and breaks are one thing, then add in some chemicals and it might get real expensive.

 



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Date: Dec 7, 2010
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Great information! Here are two pictures of an employee last week. He was able to safely traverse the roof while treating it. He's not wearing coveralls, but he has the harness, face shield, gloves, etc to protect his skin and limbs. This is not just a good measure to take for insurance reasons, but it's an excellent sales tool.

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Gotta love them hoodie pcokets. He's like me I carry everything in those pockets lol...Great pictures Morgan

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Roof Cleaning Institute Of America Master Certified Roof Cleaning Instructor

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Date: Dec 9, 2010
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I am adding several References here. Some of the info has been posted in other threads, But I am trying to bring ALL the Safety/Dot Information to one place for all the Premium Members Reference.

As posted By Bill Booze 6/22/2010
"DOT laws are federal. They state that if you carry under 1000lb of SH you will be ok without a placard."

DOT Transport name - Hypochlorite Solution
DOT Hazard Class - 8
DOT Identification # - UN1791
DOT Packing group - III

Placard Purchase Link (you want DOT Placard - Hydroclorite Solutions - UN1791 / SKU:PL-UN1791)

http://www.selectsafetysales.com/p-229-harris-dot-placards-numbered-class-8-corrosive-vinyl-placards-10-34-x-10-34.aspx

As posted by Matthew C Perry 6/24/2010
Here is a PDF of "Detailed Info on Sodium Hypochlorite"

As posted by DW 2/26/2009
Here is a PDF of "OSHA Requirements for Rooftop Work"

Added Materials Of Trade PDF file

Added Fall Protection Safety Tips PDF
Added SAFETY-Fall Protection Equipment Inspection PDF
Added OSHA Starirways and Ladders PDF
Added OSHA Small Business Hadbook PDF
Added OSHA Fall Protection PDF

AC Wrote 8/12/2010
OSHA standard is that you have on a full body harness that has its ring in the rear. Then a shock lanyard, a d-ring to a hand brake, then your rope.
We use 5/8 black line. It seems the black line "which is black" hods up to the chem very well. the rough tiles and aggrigate on the shingles beat up the rope

before the chem. The Black rope that SWAT teams use. We get it at the local outdoor shop.


Tony Wrote 10/28/2010
there are a lot of great fall protection classes to take. This is a part of the industry that i have been in for a long time and you will die if things are

not done right. Please dont read a forum and then just go out and try things. There are many factors that go into rope performance and application for

specific jobs. I see one older post that says we use rock climbing rope, well are using Static or Dynamic climbing rope. Big difference in stretch factor

when shock loaded. OSHA mandates that to be a rated anchor point for life safety the anchor must support 5,000lbs or greater in the direction of pull or

loading. At no time should you ever use a rope that is not LIFE safety rope. Home improvement stores sell rope that appears similar in construction to

Kernmantle and it is NOT safety rope.
Miller Fall Protection.com this company puts on a great training class and will help you with getting your competent person training as well. I have been

close to some job site deaths and believe me OSHA will crawl through every bit of equipment you are using, as well as any person or company advising you in

an official capacity as to your ability to use the equipment.

http://www.millerfallprotection.com/training



-- Edited by SP Cleaning on Thursday 9th of December 2010 08:13:35 AM

-- Edited by SP Cleaning on Thursday 9th of December 2010 11:21:45 AM

-- Edited by SP Cleaning on Thursday 9th of December 2010 12:24:59 PM

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This thread handily beats just having the references bookmarked in my browser.  Great idea.

I'm currently in the process of getting an OSHA 10 certification.  So far I found a helpful/good ideas.  Here are two "quickcards"  created by OSHA about ladders and respirators.  Print them out, laminate, get your employees to read them, and have them handy in your vehicle.  Employee education is really really pushed by OSHA.  I pity anyone having to tangle with them after an accident.  As with any government endeavor it's a beaurocratic nightmare but with good intentions.

 

There is also a requirement of having an OSHA safety poster visible in the workplace.  Jerry posted on this some time back if you want more info.



Attachments
respirators.pdf (29.4 kb)
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Date: Dec 9, 2010
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Andreas,

Thank You for adding your safety tips. I just added more (I edited my last post)
info.

Chris


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Date: Dec 10, 2010
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SP Cleaning wrote:

I posted some MSDS sheets in another post, and had a few fellow members suggest to put this in it's own thread. I started this thread hoping everyone can contribute to it with thier safety tips. We can make this a STICKY, and use it as our Premium Member safety reference. Safety should be top on our list before we ever start a Roof Cleaning job.

We should ALL have MSDS Sheets for any chemical we carry in our truck/trailer.
I'll get it started:

Just download and print
Hope this helps some of you out there.



Thanks what a great idea.  I have been meaning to get alot of these to keep in my truck.

 



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Roof Cleaning Institute Of America Master Certified Roof Cleaning Instructor

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Date: Dec 14, 2010
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I am adding this small tip due to a member that had a close call injury incident.

http://roof-cleaning-institute.activeboard.com/index.spark?aBID=123190&p=3&topicID=39903676

I keep a voltage tester in my tool box on the trailer. Anytime I work around
a metal structure or Gutters, I test it first.
Here is a link to the one I have.

http://www.amazon.com/Gardner-Bender-GVD-505A-Non-Contact-Voltage/sim/B000BQWU3S/2


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Date: Jan 16, 2011
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OSHA Home Visit

http://osha.gov/dcsp/smallbusiness/consult.html

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FLORIDAWASH
safe roof cleaning

Lake Marion Citrus & Sumter Counties in Florida


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guest

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Date: Jan 16, 2011
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There is a massive amount of information here ppt

eye / ppe

http://osha.gov/SLTC/multimedia.html

ladder

http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/construction/falls/4ladders.html


Effects of SH study here....this is why we need PPE!

http://osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=PREAMBLES&p_id=770

-- Edited by Washed-up on Sunday 16th of January 2011 11:11:40 PM

-- Edited by Washed-up on Sunday 16th of January 2011 11:19:11 PM

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safe roof cleaning

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Premium Member Roof Cleaning Institute of America

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Date: Jan 19, 2011
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I see you use the vent pipe anchor.  Can you tell me where I can get them?

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Premium Member Roof Cleaning Institute of America Certified Roof Cleaning Specialist

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Date: Apr 17, 2011
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Morgan,

The vent pipe anchor is a great idea. On many houses however, the sole vent pipe is located at a corn of the house. What else could one use to anchor themselves while they are on the same side of the roof but at the opposite corner?



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Dave

 Advantage Roof Cleaning Company

Certified Roof Cleaning Specialist

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Premium Member Roof Cleaning Institute of America Certified Roof Cleaning Specialist

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Date: Apr 17, 2011
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Reportedly OSHA mandates that to be a rated anchor point for life safety the anchor must support 5,000lbs or greater in the direction of pull or loading. I would think a vent pipe made of cast iron would satisfy that requirement. Will a vent pipe that is made of PVC also satisfy that requirement?



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 Advantage Roof Cleaning Company

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Premium Member Roof Cleaning Institute of America Certified Roof Cleaning Specialist

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I have a question concerning OSHA's requirement to hang a safety poster in the workplace. Not to be splitting hairs but if you are just starting out with a home office working out of your garage, does that also constitute the "workplace"? I looked for Jerry's post on this but didn't find it.



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Certified Roof Cleaning Specialist

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info@AdvantageRoofCleaning.com

www.AdvantageRoofCleaning.com 

 

 



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A tree, vehicle, strong shrub, porch railing, etc. on the opposite side of the roof will work if nothing else is available. Run a line over roof top and down to whatever you're using.

Gary



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Date: Apr 25, 2011
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oteyde wrote:

I have a question concerning OSHA's requirement to hang a safety poster in the workplace. Not to be splitting hairs but if you are just starting out with a home office working out of your garage, does that also constitute the "workplace"? I looked for Jerry's post on this but didn't find it.


 Maybe put one in the truck and one in the garage. Covered on both ends.

Have not read this post in forever, sorry for the lack of responses. Some threads just die off.

Kim R

 



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